NATIONAL SPACE CENTRE PHOTOGRAPHY

Documentary Wedding Photographer  |  Yorkshire wedding photographer  |  Hull wedding photographer


We had a truly fantastic visit to the National Space Centre in Leicester recently. We’ve been planning to visit the space centre for a couple of years, but due to work and other commitments, we kept having to rearrange. We decided this year that we would make it a priority.

Blake loves anything space or solar system related, in fact, it is his favourite topic! From NASA apps to NASA TV, to posters of all the planets on his bedroom wall. So visiting the space centre was an absolute must.

Travelling by car from Hornsea down to Leicester took us roughly two and a half hours, this is where everyone’s music playlist comes in handy.

When we arrived, the car park was located at the appropriately named Exploration Drive. From the car park there’s no mistaking where we are, with what looks like a huge bubble housing the Thor rocket, which I believe was called the Rocket Tower.

Once inside all of our eyes lit up, from the ceiling there are rockets and satellites hanging, and exhibitions around every corner. We got to see rocks from Mars and the moon, Blake controlled a rover, and we even posed in front of the spacesuit used in the movie The Martian starring Matt Damon. Pardon the pun but we had a “blast” it was so much fun along with being educational. Our trip couldn’t have ended better than a visit to the UK’s largest planetarium. It’s hard to put into words what a fantastic experience the planetarium is, the first few minutes of the planetarium show is immersive even a bit disorientating. When we left the planetarium we all looked at each other and said “wow, that was something else” it really is worth the visit.

Sadly I have to mention COVID-19, the National Space Centre have done everything they can to ensure that visitors and staff are kept safe, so a big thank you there.

We will definitely be visiting once again! Below you will find some of the photography we took while visiting the National Space Centre. All photos taken with the Sony A9 and Sony FE 24mm f1.4 GM.